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Movies

Page history last edited by PBworks 6 years, 4 months ago

 

Here are some interesting movies about autism topics. When viewing movies, keep in mind that every person with autism is a unique individual and movies simply portray other people's viewpoints and experiences with autism. Consider the information in the movies to help you better understand your child rather than adopting any one viewpoint seen in a movie.

 

MOVIES
BRIEF DESCRIPTION
 

Temple Grandin

Based on the writings by Temple Grandin, HBO Films’ "Temple Grandin" is an engaging portrait of an autistic young woman who became, through timely mentoring and sheer force of will, one of America’s most remarkable success stories. The movie also helps viewers understand how the mind of a person with autism works in pictures.

 

Available from our classroom loaning library! [Click here for more information]

 

Autism the Musical

AUTISM: THE MUSICAL is a documentary that follows the extraordinary acting coach Elaine Hall, five children with autism, and their parents as they heroically mount a full-length original stage production. Through trial and error, tears and laughter, these incredible families learn to communicate their feelings in song and performance, finding solace and joy in the act of creating. This is a really uplifting film that captures the challenges and triumphs of the group.

 

Autism is a World

"Autism is a World" is a documentary about Sue Rubin, who is autistic. Sue was diagnosed and treated as mentally retarded until the age of 13 when she began to communicate using a keyboard. Now she is a junior in college. In Sue's own words, "Autism is a World" takes the viewer on a journey into her mind, her daily world, and her life with autism. The film briefly explains autism and how it affects the brain’s wiring, yet is not meant to be a tutorial on neuro-biology but rather a personal attempt at unveiling a world that is both frustrating and confusing. Rubin discusses her feelings about solitude, social situations, and the need for familiar places and routines. Though autism will be her constant struggle, Rubin’s story is both inspiring and thought provoking.

 

Adam

A delightful romantic story about two strangers in search of an extraordinary connection. Adam (Dancy) is a brilliant but awkward astronomy buff, who is drawn out of his sheltered existence by his beautiful and outgoing new neighbor, Beth (Byrne). It's a fictional film that provides a sweet view of the challenges of autism mixed with a hopeful message.

A Mother's Courage: Talking Back to Autism

Narrated by Oscarr winner Kate Winslet and directed by Oscarr nominee Fridrik Thor Fridriksson, this inspiring film follows one woman's quest to unlock her autistic son's mind. Margret, whose ten-year-old son Keli is severely autistic, has tried a number of treatments to help her son. Consumed by an unquenchable thirst for knowledge about this mysterious and complex condition, she travels from her home in Iceland to the United States and Europe, meeting with top autism experts and advocates. She also connects with several other families touched by autism, whose struggles echo her own: the endless doctor visits and experiments with different treatments, the complication of doing everyday tasks, and the inability to communicate - perhaps the most painful and frustrating aspect of autism. But as she comes across innovative new therapies with the potential to break down the walls of autism, Margret finds hope that her son may be able to express himself on a level she never thought possible. (Note: I haven't seen this, but it looks good.)

Through the Eyes of Autism

This short film is a valuable tool for all people involved with children and adults with autism. It give you a look at how they see things through their eyes without technical terms and written descriptions. It is visual and that is truly what it is all about for many individuals with autism. My son has autism and he watches it and talks to us about what he sees and how it makes him feel. You can attempt to describe how some lighting makes them feel, but this movie shows you how it makes them feel! Awesome look into their lives. It would be a great tool for the parents or teachers just learning about the sensory world for people with autism. No film would ever be able to give it all to you because they are all so different, but this is a well rounded look into how differently they may see things in the world. (Note: I haven't seen this film, but it looks very interesting!)

Loving Lampposts

As autism has exploded into the public consciousness over the last 20 years, two opposing questions have been asked about the condition: is it a devastating sickness to be cured? Or is it a variation of the human brain - just a different way to be human? After his son's diagnosis, filmmaker Todd Drezner visits the front lines of the autism wars. We meet the "recovery movement," which views autism as a tragic epidemic brought on by environmental toxins. Operating outside the boundaries of mainstream medicine, these parents, doctors, and therapists search for unconventional treatments that can "reverse" autism and restore their children to normal lives. (Note: I haven't seen this film, but it looks interesting)

The Red Kite Project

What is autism? How does it affect those who have it and their families? How can we bring those with autism more into the mainstream of our communities? And what role can the arts play in all of their lives? The Red Kite Project is a must see film for all those who have had autism touch their lives. It brings you a wide range of unique perspectives from artists and doctors, to teachers, parents and the children themselves. Having spent 13 years volunteering in classrooms of children with autism, Jacqueline Russell, Artistic Director of Chicago Children's Theatre set out to assemble a team of people from a wide range of disciplines to bring joy, excitement and educational experiences to those who really needed it. And as their experiences and learnings spread across the U.S. and the world, the results are changing the landscape for children with autism, their families and caregivers. (Note: I haven't seen this, but it could be interesting)

 

 

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